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Research | Faculty | Alumni

Research

June 2011 Understanding the Universe Through Scalable Navigation of a Galaxy of Annotations
Associate Professor Alexandros Labrinidis, Professor Panos K. Chrysanthis, and Assistant Professor Liz Marai are awarded a four-year, $1.6M NSF Grant . Understanding the Universe through Scalable Navigation of a Galaxy of Annotations will impact the ability to share astronomical data quickly and widely. They will be working with Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty Jeffrey Newman, Michael Wood-Vasey and Arthur Kosowsky.

June 2010 CSR: Large: Storage Class Memory Architecture for Efficient Data
Associate Professor Bruce Childers (Principal Investigator) awarded an NSF grant and is a joint CS and ECE project. Dr. Childers will be working with Sangyeun Cho (Co-PI), Dr. Daniel Mosse' (Co-PI), Dr. Jun Yang (Co-PI), and Dr. Youtao Zhang (Co-PI). This project uses multiple technologies to construct a high-capacity, energy efficient memory system for virtualized computer servers with a new Storage Class Memory Architecture that incorporates multiple memory technologies such as DRAM, Phase-change memory (PRAM) and Flash.

April 2010 Toward Formal, Risk-Aware Authorization
Assistant Professor Adam Lee receives a four year NSF Award in the Trustworthy Computing Program. The Trustworthy Computing Program supports research and education activities that explore novel frameworks, theories, and approaches towards secure and privacy-preserving systems, recognizing that a number of intertwined scientific, technological, economic and sociological challenges must be overcome, if we are to realize a trustworthy computing future.

December 2009 Enabling Fast and Versatile Packet Processing for Future Larger-Scale Networks
Assistant Professor Sangyuen Cho receives a two-year NSF Award in the Division of Computer and Communication Foundations. This exploratory research addresses the increasingly more critical performance, power, and functional requirements of search operations in key inter-networking devices like routers and firewalls.

October 2009 Using Medical Records Repositories to Improve the Alert System Design
Associate Professor Milos Hauskrecht was awarded a $1,137,679, 3-year grant from the National Library of Medicine (NIH) to develop and study a new computational framework from off-line evaluation and optimization of clinical alerting systems based on retrospective electronic health record data.

October 2009 Detecting Deviations in Clinical Care in ICU data Streams
Associate Professor Milos Hauskrecht with his collaborator Professor Gilles Clermont in the Department of Critical Care has received $1,521,570 for a 3-year grant from the National Institute of General Medical Studies (NIH) to study computational methods for detecting deviations in clinical care in intensive care unit (ICU) data.

October 2009 Word Sense and Multilingual Subjectivity Analysis
Professor Janyce Wiebe received an NSF Award in the Robust Intelligence Program. The goal of this three year project is to investigate novel methods for subjectivity sense labeling, and to exploit the results in sense-aware subjectivity and sentiment analysis.

Sept 2009 An Affect-Adaptive Spoken Dialogue System that Responds Based on User Model and Multiple Affective States
Professor Diane Litman receives an NSF Award in the Robust Intelligence and the Human-Centered Computing Programs. The goal of this three year project is to improve the state of the art in affective spoken dialogue systems along three dimensions, by drawing on the results of prior research in a wider spoken dialogue and affective system communities.

Aug 2009 Towards a Dynamic and Composable Model of Trust
Assistant Professor Adam Lee received an NSF Award in the Trustworthy Computing Program. The Trustworthy Computing Program supports research and education activities that explore novel frameworks, theories, and approaches towards secure and privacy-preserving systems, recognizing that a number of intertwined scientific, technological, economic and sociological challenges must be overcome, if we are to realize a trustworthy computing future.

Jul 2008 CAREER: Robust Parsing for New Domains and Languages
Assistant Professor Rebecca Hwa, received an award from the Faculty Early Career Development Program. The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization.

Aug 2006 Understanding Events and Beliefs Expressed in Text
Professor Janyce Wiebe will lead research in a University Affiliate Research Center funded by the Department of Homeland Security. The center has been awarded $2.4 million over the next three years to develop accurate and robust techniques for extracting and summarizing information about events and beliefs from text.

Jan 2006 – Center for Modeling Pulmonary Immunity
Professor Panos K. Chrysanthis and Professor Alexandros Labrinidis will lead the bioinformatics effort in the recently established Center for Modeling Pulmonary Immunity. The center was established in September 2005, from a $9 million contract from the National Institutes of Health, and is a joint effort between the University of Pittsburgh (School of Medicine and School of Arts & Sciences), Carnegie Mellon, and the University of Michigan.

Aug 2005 – Parsing Arabic Dialects
This summer, Assistant Professor Rebecca Hwa, along with researchers from Columbia University, the University of Maryland and the University of Amsterdam, is participating in an NSF-sponsored workshop on Parsing Arabic Dialects. Students from Stanford University, The University of Pittsburgh, Johns Hopkins University and Georgia Tech are also participating in the project.

Aug 2005 – Optoelectronic Computing Research Group Installs Clean Room
The newest addition to the research facilities in Sennott Square is a 300 square foot, class 1000 clean room facility in the fifth floor optical computing lab. Dr. Chiarulli and Dr. Levitan use this facility in their research on high-speed optical and electronic data links for chip-to-chip and network-on-chip applications.

June 2005 – Kurt VanLehn Presents LearnLab in D.C.
Kurt VanLehn, a professor in Pitt's Department of Computer Science and codirector of the Pitt-Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center (PSLC), represented the University at the June 21 Exhibition of the Coalition for National Science Funding in Washington, D.C.

Faculty

2011 – Jingtao Wang
Assistant Professor Jingtao Wang selected for the 12th annual Provost's Advisory Council on Instructional Excellence (ACIE). His proposal, Software as a Service for Mobile Computing is one of only eight to receive an ACIE award this year.

2011 – Sangyeun Cho
Associate Professor Sangyeun Cho selected for the 12th annual Provost's Advisory Council on Instructional Excellence (ACIE). His proposal, Cracking Personal Supercomputing is one of only eight to receive an ACIE award this year.

2011 – Diane Litman
Professor Diane Litman participates in the IBM Watson Symposium on March 30, 2011. Diane Litman was a panelist in the Natural Language Processing (NLP) forum, along with David Ferucci, PI of the deepQA/Watson Project for IBM; and Eric Nyberg, professor in CMU's Language Technology Institute. The symposium ended with the IBM Watson Presentation, Demonstration and Q&A Panel with a Jeopardy! challenge between Pitt student team, CMU student team, and Watson.

2010 – Panos Chrysanthis
Professor Panos Chrysanthis receives the Distinguished Scientist Award of the Asssociation of Computing Machinery (ACM). This distinction is for his contributions to the fields of computing and information technology. Panos is the first faculty member to receive this ACM award at the University of Pittsburgh.

2010 – Liz Marai
Assistant Professor Liz Marai receives an NSF CAREER grant. Her work under this grant will investigate in much more detail the human anatomy and dynamics to further progress in replicating human articulation capabilities.

2009 – Liz Marai
Congratulations to Liz Marai, Assistant Professor, for receiving the 2009 Provostís Advisory Council on Instructional Excellence (ACIE) innovation in education award. Her proposal, Immersive Software Engineering, is one of only eleven to receive an ACIE award this year.

2009 – Kyoungsoo Park
Welcome KyoungSoo Park, Assistant Professor, the newest faculty member to the Department. The goal of Dr. Park's research is to find and establish the fundamental principles in designing and improving the large-scale networked systems which impact the daily lives of millions of people.

2008 – Adam Lee
Welcome Adam Lee, Assistant Professor, the new faculty member to the Department. His research interests lie at the intersection of the computer security, privacy, and distributed systems fields.

2008 – Alexandros Labrinidis
Congratulations to our Assistant Professor, Alexandros Labrinidis, who is the recipient of a 2008 NSF Career Award for his work, "CAREER: User-Centric Data Management."

2008 – Sangyeun Cho
Congratulations to our Assistant Professor, Sangyeun Cho, on receiving a 2008 A. Richard Newton scholarship.

2008 – Rebecca Hwa
Congratulations to our Assistant Professor, Rebecca Hwa, who is the recipient of a 2008 NSF Career Award for her work, "CAREER: Robust Parsing for New Domains and Languages."

2007 – Liz Marai
Dr. Liz Marai joined the Computer Science Department as an Assistant Professor in the fall of 2007. Dr. Marai received her BS in Computer Science and Engineering from the "Politehnica" University in Bucharest, Romania. In May of 2007, she received her PhD from Brown University.

2005 – Daniel Mossé
Dr. Daniel Mossť became a full Professor in the Computer Science Department in 2004. Here, he discusses how he came to the department, his love for teaching, and his (so far) fruitless campaign to squeeze more time into a 24-hour day.

2005 – Sangyeun Paul Cho
Sangyeun Cho joined the Department of Computer Science in the fall of 2004. He received his BS in computer engineering from Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea in 1994, and his PhD in computer science from the University of Minnesota in 2002.

2004 – Panos Chrysanthis
Dr. Panos K. Chrysanthis officially became the ninth full Professor in our Department on 1.1.2004. He is the co-director of the Advanced Data Management Technologies (ADMT) lab which focuses on innovative theories, paradigms, and applications in network-centric data management.

2003 – Rebecca Hwa
Dr. Rebecca Hwa joined the Department of Computer Science in the fall of 2003. She received her BS in Computer Science and Engineering from UCLA in 1993, and her PhD in Computer Science from Harvard University in 2001. Her research is in the areas of artificial intelligence and natural language processing.

Alumni

2005 – Ras Bodik
Ras Bodik got his PhD at Pitt in 2000 under the guidance of Rajiv Gupta and Mary Lou Soffa.† He then went on to work as an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin.† After two happy years in Madison, he moved to the University of California at Berkeley, where he is now a tenure-track assistant professor.† He has won the ACM SIGPLAN Doctoral Dissertation Award and the NSF CAREER Award, as well as two teaching awards at the University of Wisconsin.

2005 – Mary Lou Soffa
After being recruited by a number of other universities during her outstanding academic career, Professor Mary Lou Soffa finally succumbed to an offer ó a very attractive offer. She decided to leave her faculty position in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Pittsburgh, effective September of 2004, to assume the roles of Owen R. Cheatham Professor and Chair of the Department of Computer Science of the University of Virginia.

2004 – Gerard A. Pompa
Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Mr. Pompa received his BS in computer science and mathematics and his MS in computer science from the University of Pittsburgh in 1981 and 1987. He was employed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation in the Nuclear Service Integration and Service Technology Divisions from 1981 to 1987 in software engineering. He designed and implemented software systems for real-time control robotic equipment and other devices for inspecting and repairing nuclear power plant components.

2003 – D. Raja
D. Raja is the co-founder of Computer Enterprises, Inc., better known as CEI. Originally from Bangalore, India, Raja underwent his schooling in Chennai. He holds an undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Anna University, India. Raja moved to the United States from India to obtain his M.S. in Computer Science at the University of Pittsburgh. While he was still pursuing his Masters, Raja began his professional career as a software engineer. He worked for over five years at Formtek, a Lockheed Company, where he quickly scaled the ranks from software engineer to manager of the software department.

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